FDHealthy FoodEating healthily can save a family of four $150 at the checkout a fortnight, research finds
FDHealthy FoodEating healthily can save a family of four $150 at the checkout a fortnight, research finds
Healthy Food

Eating healthily can save a family of four $150 at the checkout a fortnight, research finds

Eating healthily can be less expensive than the unhealthy diet many Australians currently live on, a new study has found.

A regional Victorian hospital’s health promotion unit has shown that by following the recommended Australian Dietary Guidelines, families can save $150 at the checkout a fortnight.

And that’s without needing to buy expensive items from the heath food aisle.

But it does involve wheeling the trolley past national favorites like sausages and beer, wine and preserved meats, fruit juice, sweet snacks and muesli bars.

The study took a trolley to the supermarket aisles to test the affordability of the Australian Dietary Guidelines, comparing the cost of the recommended diet to what an average Australian family buys and eats a fortnight.

The health food aisle at a chain supermarket with superfoods for sale.

Ancient grains and superfoods are great but not essential for a healthy diet.(ABC South West Victoria: Emily Bissland)

‘Back to basics’

The study is part of a food affordability project at Warrnambool Base Hospital’s South West Healthcare: Healthy Communities.

Project coordinator Caitlyn Hoggan says the cost of living is overwhelmingly the perceived barrier to a healthy diet for the average Australian family.

“We did a study earlier this year looking at people’s dietary habits and what people are purchasing and consuming in Warrnambool,” she says.

“We found that price was the biggest concern when it came to people choosing what to eat.”

“There is a perception that healthy food costs more, but our research shows that eating [according to] the Australian Dietary Guidelines saves money.”

A young woman holds a basket of vegetables in front of nuts displayed at Coles

Caitlyn Hoggan says it comes down to eating five servings of vegetables and two servings of fruit a day.(
ABC News: Emily Bissland
)

Ms Hoggan says the guidelines are “nothing groundbreaking” but are just “back to the basics” when it comes to healthy eating.

“It’s the good old fruit and vegetables; five serves of vegetables, two serves of fruit a day,” she says.

“Those healthy wholegrains and dairy as well, we recommend eating those five food groups.”

What Aussies eat

According to the CSIRO, Australians can no longer claim to be the bronzed, muscle-bound nation we once were and are in fact “failing when it comes to embracing a balanced diet”.

Hi, Iā€™m mtech